The student news website of Omaha Central High School

The Dangers of Idolizing Celebrities

What Kendall Jenner says about how you should want to look should be irrelevant to you. That goes for any other form of idea that is spewed out by the elite in American society. Influencers are merely puppets paid off by company owners and shareholders to convince and lie to the average citizen about whatever they need to sell.

September 23, 2021

It is commonplace today for people to idolize, honor and aspire to be like celebrities and people of influence. What many fail to recognize is that most people with social power are to some degree corrupt.

Every day, we see politicians tweet from the comfort of their mansions about making change while simultaneously making no effort to make change while having the means to do so.

What is extremely interesting is that everyone idolizes a person of influence. I personally idolize and look up to some celebrities because it is hard not to despite me feeling it is wrong. For example, we see people idolize star athletes like LeBron James for the good he does do in communities across America, while ignoring his wrongdoings that outweigh his great deeds.

Despite LeBron being a good person, he is ridiculed by his “haters” for his position on the unjust things that went on in Hong Kong not so long ago. LeBron decided to have no comment on the incidents going on there in order to risk potential revenue loss for his personal brands and for the NBA.

Many say someone who stands on neither side, stand for nothing at all, which is applicable to this singular anecdote.

This is not to say that LeBron James does nothing good though. He has raised millions of dollars for children in lower income areas across Ohio, built a school for kids who can’t afford or receive good education and advocated for rights of all peoples in America. For me though, that singular act makes me think that he is someone not worth idolizing. Someone worth idolizing would take the hit monetarily to create change.

This theme can also be seen in what is called identity politics. Identity politics is basing the identity of one’s self around that of your political views, often leading to no independent thought of issues and rather just listening to general party alignment.

The idolization of politicians is something we saw in the spotlight last year around this time. People formed their opinions, personalities and general things about them entirely dependent on who “their” presidential candidate was.

This is a dangerous thing to do, and a dangerous precedent to set. Forming these ideological opinions based on your deep love and respect for Trump, Biden or any other politician creates toxicity and a lack of free-flowing ideas in our society.

I am a firm believer in creating your own independent views of subjects based on your own experiences. It is often that we see this mindset rarely in today’s generation. Not only do we see this opinion forming with politicians, but with modern influencers as well.

Beauty standards are not set by average people, with average pay, average life styles and average access to resources, but instead by the loud, wealthy minority who are the opposite of all of that.

What Kendall Jenner says about how you should want to look should be irrelevant to you. That goes for any other form of idea that is spewed out by the elite in American society. Influencers are merely puppets paid off by company owners and shareholders to convince and lie to the average citizen about whatever they need to sell. This is why I find it hard to believe and idolize and trust influencers, politicians and celebrities. With all that being said I encourage everyone to be free thinking, develop your own opinions and most of all, be independent in your thought process.

Donate to The Register
$665
$1500
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation will support the student journalists of Omaha Central High School. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

The Register • Copyright 2023 • FLEX WordPress Theme by SNOLog in

Donate to The Register
$665
$1500
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (0)

All The Register Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *